National Talk Like a Pirate Day is Here!

pirateship

 

In honor of National Talk Like a Pirate Day, I would like to explore the world of fictional pirates, instead of annoying you with actually talking like a pirate. Enjoy my list of the top five pirates in literature.

Peter Pan, by JM Barrie

captainhook

Captain Hook is a creature of infantile nightmares. He’s almost comical in ways and maybe that was Barrie’s desire. The lost boys have to share their coveted Neverland with Hook and his buddies. However, it is Peter Pan that rules that island. With some flying, crowing, and a wickedly evil ticking clock!

Treasure Island, by RL Stevenson

blindpew

The sound of Blind Pew tapping his way along with his stick outside the Admiral Benbow inn is one of the most spine-tingling in all children’s fiction, but Stevenson knew that the best pirate combines terror with charm. Thus the horror at human perfidy when Jim Hawkins, hidden in the apple barrel, overhears Long John Silver’s evil plans. A treasure map, Captain Flint, “pieces of eight”: every element of Stevenson’s yarn has entered the collective unconscious.

“The Gold-Bug”, by Edgar Allan Poe

William LeGrand
Poe’s narrator tells the story of his relationship with the reclusive William LeGrand. LeGrand becomes convinced that he knows the location of treasure buried by the infamous pirate Captain Kidd. After a bizarre series of rituals, LeGrand leads him to the buried chest.

Captain Singleton, by Daniel Defoe

Captain Singleton

The original title page boasts that the book contains Singleton’s “many Adventures and Pyracies with the famous Captain Avery and others”. (Avery was a distinctly non-fictional pirate.) Bob Singleton confesses himself “an original Thief”, but patriotically preys only on Spanish ships.

Pericles, by William Shakespeare

Pericles

There are more pirates than you might expect in Shakespeare, in unexpected plays such as Hamlet and Antony and Cleopatra. But they play the biggest role in Pericles, where they providentially intervene to prevent the murder of the heroine, Marina. True, the pirates then sell her into prostitution, but Marina guards her virginity and converts her would-be clients to virtue.

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